Prisoners and phone calls

There are telephones in the prison available to prisoners which they can use to keep in touch with families and friends. It is likely that there will be restrictions on the time of day a prisoner can use the telephone. It is also quite common for the prisoner to have to queue to use the telephone and some prisons use a booking system to make an appointment to use the telephone. There are generally only one or two telephones per wing.

Prisoners are not allowed to receive calls from outside the prison.

How are the calls paid for?

Prisoners are required to cover the cost of their phone calls from their private cash or earnings.  If you want to help a prisoner with the cost of making calls then you can send money to them at the prison by way of a postal order, for more details visit Property and Money.

Prisoners do not use ‘phone cards’. On reception to prison, prisoners are given a PIN number and a form on which they need to provide the details (name, address, telephone number) of up to twenty people they wish to have contact with and up to fifteen legal numbers. These numbers will need to be approved by security before being attached to the PIN number. A prisoner can then only make telephone calls to those people he/she has elected to.

Prisoners can be banned from using certain telephone numbers. This might include those of victims or the press.

What if it is an emergency?

If a prisoner cannot access a Pinphone and needs to get in touch with someone as a matter or urgency, for example for very strong compassionate reasons then they may, at the Governor’s discretion, be permitted to use an official telephone.

Are telephone calls monitored?

Prison officers can listen to a number of calls at random. For most prisoners, other than Category A prisoners, calls are not routinely checked unless there is some intelligence to suggest illegal activity may be taking place. Calls made by all high risk Category A prisoners are monitored.

Calls will be terminated if a call contains anything that:

  • Relates to escape plans or compromises the security of the prison
  • Is connected to a criminal offence or a breach in prison rules
  • Threatens national security
  • Is threatening or indicates blackmail
  • Is racially offensive or obscene in nature

Calls made to Samaritans, legal advisers, the Prison and Probation Ombudsman’s office, the Criminal Cases Review Committee, Consular Officials and a number of other ‘confidential access organisations’ are not listened to.

Can I write to a prisoner?

Yes. A prisoner can receive an unrestricted number of letters through the post, except if they are in a prison where letters are routinely read.

Will the letters be read?

All letters are opened to ensure that no unauthorised items are contained within but they are not generally read. However letters, as with phone calls, may be randomly checked or more routinely monitored where there is intelligence to suggest illegal activity may be taking place. All letters, both incoming and outgoing, may be read in high security establishments.

Letters must also not contain anything that:

  • Relates to escape plans or compromises the security of the prison
  • Is connected to a criminal offence or a breach in prison rules
  • Threatens national security
  • Is threatening or indicates blackmail
  • Is racially offensive or obscene in nature

Letters will be stopped if the above rules are broken.

Prisoners writing letters

Each week a prisoner is allowed to send one free letter. If they want to send more than this then they need to purchase stamps and envelopes from the prison shop/canteen. Alternatively you can post self addressed stamped envelopes to the prisoner so they can post letters back to you. If a prisoner is on remand then they are allowed to send 2 free letters a week.

What if I do not want the prisoner to write to me any more?

Contact the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) Victim Helpline if you get unwanted letters, phone calls, texts or messages from a prisoner.

You can also contact the helpline if you’re worried about someone being released from prison.

NOMS Victim Helpline
victim.helpline@noms.gsi.gov.uk
Telephone: 0300 060 6699
Monday to Friday, 9am to 4pm

Photographs

You can send photos of family members, but do remember that prisoners are not allowed photographs of themselves, and that includes family snapshots that include them. Photographs of an explicit or pornographic nature would not be allowed.

Certain prisoners may not be permitted to have photographs of children.

Sending a Prisoner clothes, toiletries or gifts

Each prison varies in what can and cannot be sent into a prisoner so it is best to contact the prison beforehand. Alternatively you can contact the visitor centre at the prison who will be able to tell you what can be sent in and how to send it in, for more details visit Property and Money.

It is strongly recommended that any gifts or money being sent into the prison be sent by recorded delivery.

E-mail

The organisation emailaprisoner.com (EMAP)has systems set up in a number of prisons which enable families and friends to send emails to prisoners. Messages cost 30p each. This system does not provide a direct email to the prisoner. Staff in the prison post room print off the email, put in an envelope and deliver it to the prisoner with the rest of their correspondence.

To find out if you can take advantage of this service log on to www.emailaprisoner.com.

The contents of emails must follow the same rules as letters and telephone calls. At present there is no facility for prisoners to email out.